Nanites + mRNA “Vaccines” are Gene Therapy.

There are nanoparticles in these gene therapy inoculations. These are not vaccines and they knew they could be sold to the public as vaccines and not as some sort of gene therapy that modifies cells. No one would honestly be sold on getting a gene therapy like chemo. Am I right?

This first article was written in 2018. Read this in light of knowing that this mRNA is carried to your cells through LNP’s (Lipid Nano Particles). Then after you read these excerpts from this article, read these articles and this excerpt from this medical white paperson these “vaccines and nanotechnology”. Think of the nanites as the vehicles carrying the passengers to a specific destination.

mRNA is like software for the cell.” – ModeRNA

Should we develop nanotechnology? One of the most overlooked threats to human civilization is the end of Moore’s law, the tendency of making smaller and smaller electronics to keep the global economy running and prevent social collapse. One day, this drive to make increasingly smaller computer chips might be taken over by trillions of bacteria-sized robots called “Nanites”, created to be like life so they can propagate themselves to serve our needs. This idea is built on the concept of a “Nanoreplicator” or “Autoassembler”, a speculative self-replicating machine that can disassemble and reassemble molecules from raw materials at the atomic level, a kind of microscopic 3D printer scaled up to an autonamous machine.

With nanoreplicators we’d be able to clean up pollution, seek and destroy malevolent microbes, create a post scarcity economy, and dare I say it, even cure death. These nanites would technically be considered another form of life, just like plants converting gas and water into sugar, or like yeast cells fermenting sugar into alcohol, or even viruses converting protein to make more viruses. A nanite would essentially work like none-biological viruses except that they’d assemble molecules much faster and more efficiently than nature can. But with new solutions come new problems, and Autoassemblers are no exception.

They might be able to manufacture the electronics and factories that save Moore’s law from breaking down, but there’s a catch, if these machines were to become self aware or even just malfunction, they could grow like a cancer into a world devouring swarm of abiotic locusts, stripping the Earth of all biomass so they could use it to further replicate themselves. This is the grey goo.
We’re talking machines that are invisible to the naked eye, meaning one the size of a flea would be considered a very large nanobot.
Once programmed, nothing could stop them and if they were to gain a sufficient degree of intelligence, then why shouldn’t they reproduce themselves just as all life does? Drexler compares the functionality of nanobots to the functionality of life itself, believing they would even out-compete actual plants until we no longer have a green planet, but a grey one.
Nanobots as they are being developed at MIT clearly won’t be little A.I robots like everyone expects, but rather, carefully designed biomechanical structures, similar to enzymes or vectors...Perhaps the best solution would just be to ban nanotechnology research. A solution to the problems of Blue Goo could be mass surveillance with a utility fog-based technology called “angelnetting” or “demonnetting” to enforce a worldwide ban on nanotechnology using a global government, but in that case you’ll basically be using the book 1984 as an instruction manual.” (https://humanityplus.wordpress.com/2017/10/12/grey-goo-how-probable-is-a-nanobot-apocalypse/amp/)

Lipid nanoparticles are the fatty molecular envelopes that help strands of mRNA — the genetic messenger for making DNA code into proteins — evade the body’s biological gatekeepers and reach their target cell without being degraded. They are enabling some of the most advanced technologies being used in vaccines and drugs.

These carriers are used to package the active chemicals in drugs such as the chemotherapy Doxil or the cholesterol-lowering medicines Repatha and Praluent so they get to their targets with fewer unwanted side effects. And nanoparticles are being investigated to ferry the genome-editing CRISPR-Cas9 to target organs, in hopes of solving another delivery challenge.

Nanomedicine is crucial to delivering mRNA vaccines, but it is also key in reformulating existing drugs and formulating new ones to treat Covid-19 patients, the new report explains. Before Covid-19 spread around the globe, mRNA vaccines were in the early stages of development in biotech companies, and nanotechnology was central to their efforts.

“After all, viruses are naturally occurring nanoparticles, and indeed, the nanotechnology community has long been trying to capitalize on the properties of viruses and mimic their behaviour, for example, for the design of virus-like nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and gene editing,” an editorial in Nature Nanotechnology pointed out in August.” (https://www.statnews.com/2020/12/01/how-nanotechnology-helps-mrna-covid19-vaccines-work/)

This explains how this cargo gets delivered to its destination.

Here I want to discuss just one aspect of these new vaccines – how the mRNA molecule is delivered to the cells where we want it to go, and then caused to enter those cells, where it does its job of making the virus proteins that cause the chain of events leading to immunity. This relies on packaging the mRNA molecules inside nanoscale delivery devices. These packages protect the mRNA from the body’s defense mechanisms, carry it undamaged into the interior of a target cell through the cell’s protective membrane, and then open up to release the bare mRNA molecules to do their job.

The basic membrane components are a phospholipid analogous to that found in cell membranes (DSPC – distearoylphosphatidylcholine), together with cholesterol, which makes the bilayer more stable and less permeable. Added to that is a lipid to which is attached a short chain of the water-soluble polymer PEO. This provides the nanoparticle with a hairy coat, which probably helps the nanoparticle avoid some of the body’s defences by repelling the approach of any macromolecules (artificial vesicles thus decorated are sometimes known as “stealth liposomes”), and perhaps also controls the shape and size of the nanoparticles. Finally, perhaps the crucial ingredient is another lipid, with a tertiary amine head group – an ionisable lipid. This is what the chemists call a weak base – like ammonia, it can accept a proton to become positively charged (a cation). Crucially, its charge state depends on the acidity or alkalinity of its environment.

To make the nanoparticles, these four components are dissolved in ethanol, while the RNA is dissolved in a mildly acidic solution in water. Then the two solutions are mixed together, and out of that mixture, by the marvel of self-assembly, the nanoparticles appear, with the RNA safely packaged up inside them. Of course, it’s more complicated.

When the ionisable lipid sees the acidic environment, it becomes positively charged – and, since the RNA molecule is negatively charged, the ionisable lipid and the RNA start to associate. Meanwhile, the other lipids will be self-organising into sheets two molecules thick, with the hydrophilic head groups on the outside and the oily tails in the middle. These sheets will roll up into little spheres, at the same time incorporating the ionisable lipids with their associated mRNA, to produce the final nanoparticles, with the RNA encapsulated inside them.

When the nanoparticles are injected into the patient’s body, their hairy coating, from the PEO grafted lipids, will give them some protection against the body’s defences. When they come into contact with the membrane of a cell, the ionisable lipid is once again crucial. Some of the natural lipids that make up the membrane coating the cell are negatively charged – so when they see the positively charged head-group of the ionisable lipids in the nanoparticles, they will bind to them. This has the effect of disrupting the membrane, creating a gap to allow the nanoparticle in.

This is a delicate business – cationic surfactants like CTAB use a similar mechanism to disrupt cell membranes, but they do that so effectively that they kill the cell – that’s why we can make disinfectants out of them. The cationic lipid in the nanoparticle must have been chosen so that it disrupts the membrane enough to let the nanoparticle in, but not so much as to destroy it. Once inside the cell, the conditions must be different enough that the nanoparticle, which is only held together by relatively weak forces, breaks open to release its RNA payload.” (http://www.softmachines.org/wordpress/?p=2541)

COVID-19 Vaccine Frontrunners and Their Nanotechnology Design

Young Hun Chung, Veronique Beiss, […], and Nicole F. Steinmetz

Moderna reached clinical trials 63 days after their sequence selection.8 It is striking that an unestablished nanotechnology formulation reached clinical testing almost a full month before established approaches (i.e., inactivated and live-attenuated vaccines) entered clinical trials.9,10 This highlights the opportunity for less developed technology platforms in vaccine development and, if proven successful, may enable a more rapid response to future emergent infectious diseases. It is also of note that in previous severe coronavirus outbreaks of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV clinical trials were not reached until 25 and 22 months after the outbreaks began.11 Older severe infectious disease outbreaks such as Dengue and Chikungunya did not reach clinical trials until 52 and 19 years after the outbreak.11 The improved speed into clinical trials is hopeful, but despite the rapid progress, there are still reasons for concern.oderna reached clinical trials 63 days after their sequence selection.8 It is striking that an unestablished nanotechnology formulation reached clinical testing almost a full month before established approaches (i.e., inactivated and live-attenuated vaccines) entered clinical trials.9,10 This highlights the opportunity for less developed technology platforms in vaccine development and, if proven successful, may enable a more rapid response to future emergent infectious diseases. It is also of note that in previous severe coronavirus outbreaks of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV clinical trials were not reached until 25 and 22 months after the outbreaks began.11 Older severe infectious disease outbreaks such as Dengue and Chikungunya did not reach clinical trials until 52 and 19 years after the outbreak.11 The improved speed into clinical trials is hopeful, but despite the rapid progress, there are still reasons for concern.
Vaccine development takes time as the vaccines must not only be protective but also safe. Unlike other drugs that are delivered into sick patients, vaccines are administered into healthy patients and require very high safety margins.12 Therefore, the population should be carefully monitored if vaccine candidates are widely administered based on Emergency Use Authorization.
Many of the vaccines that are frontrunners are preclinical nanotechnologies and have not been proven in clinical settings. For instance, mRNA vaccines have been in development and clinical testing for the past 30 years, but the technology has not been previously approved.

Nanotechnology Offers Opportunities in Vaccine Design

Nanoparticles and viruses operate at the same size scale; therefore, nanoparticles have an ability to enter cells to enable expression of antigens from delivered nucleic acids (mRNA and DNA vaccines) and/or directly target immune cells for delivery of antigens (subunit vaccines). Many vaccine technologies employ these direct benefits by encapsulating genomic material or protein/peptide antigens in nanoparticles such as lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) or other viruses such as Ads. BioNTech/Pfizer and Moderna encapsulate their mRNA vaccines within LNPs while the University of Oxford/Astrazeneca (from here on out referred to as Oxford/Astrazeneca) and CanSino incorporate antigen-encoding sequences within the DNA carried by Ads.17,19,22,23

Lastly, due to the “nano” scale of nanomaterials as well as their composition, they can traffic in vivo differently from other materials. The lymphatic system is critical in initiating immune responses as APCs, and other lymphocytes travel from peripheral organs to nearby lymph nodes using the lymphatic system.58 Accessing the lymphatic system can be challenging, but nanomaterials can traverse the interstitial spaces and access nearby lymph nodes. For instance, inhaled radiolabeled solid lipid nanoparticles were shown to traffic from the alveoli into nearby lymph nodes via the lymphatic system, while the free radiotracers trafficked via the systemic circulation.59
Lastly, viral vector vaccines contain engineered genomes to encode the antigen of the target pathogen. When administered in vivo, the viral vectors enter target cells and the genomic material is transcribed and translated for in vivo antigen production.68 They can, but do not always, possess the ability to replicate within the host.

(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7553041/)

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