The Golan and the Heifer

Trump recently recognized the Golan Heights a part of Israel. Syria sure doesn’t and I’m sure Jordan doesn’t either. Why does Trump do that now? Well there is a clear pathway from Syria to Israel through the Golan Heights as Scripture (the prophet Daniel) tells us the man of sin enters Israel ie the glorious land from the North. This is a much needed area to be “free” so to speak so this can happen. Ironically, Mt. Hermon is just steps North of the Golan and Golan comes from Bashan in the Bible. Who was king of Bashan? Og the giant. But is there something else to Trumps Golan statement?

I have written on the red heifer more than anyone I know and have spent 3 years writing a book based on my theory about the red heifer being the culmination of the abomination that makes desolate. When I speak on the red heifer I know what I’m talking about. With that said, a new article on the red heifer came out in a Orthodox Jewish magazine called Mishpaca. It’s an interesting read, especially the last page, but it starts out saying that the red heifers are being bred in the Golan area. Well…that’s news to me.

The Temple Institute has stressed over and over that they were being bred in the Negev Desert which is completely South of the Golan. Maybe they kept saying that to protect the site? I don’t know, but what I do know now is Trumps strange statement about recognising the Golan Heights and how they are now being a part of Israel makes more sense. They (Israel) needed Trump to recognize the Golan as theirs based off of one thing. The red heifer. It’s coming closer to the end and they know it.

Below is an excerpt from the article posted by the Temple Institute. I’ll write more about this on my blog.

“FROM MISHPACHA MAGAZINE: SACRED COW

This past week the Orthodox Jewish magazine, Mishpacha, ran a full length article about the Temple Institute’s Raise a Red Heifer in Israel program. The magazine is a print and no an online magazine. Following the openinmg paragraphs below, the continuation of the article can be read via the photos of the pages that we have received. When enlarged to full size the pages are quite readible.

by Shlomi Gil

On a cattle ranch somewhere in the Golan, a red calf has been born that may have an impact on the future of the entire Jewish people. Is it possible that this Red Angus cow, now over a year old and still unblemished, will be the tenth and final Parah Adumah?

While the weeks leading up to Pesach don’t automatically make people think of vacations,the Golan Heights actually attracts thousands of visitors at this time of year, after the winter rains have replenished the earth and the lush green foliage and multi-colored flora take bloom. But we were in the region to look out for another burst of color — we wanted to meet the cattle rancher who’s taken on raising what he hopes might be the next red heifer.
He’s happy to host us, as long as we don’t reveal his name or the exact location of his ranch up here in Israeli cattle country. “Things are already getting complicated for me,” he says. “In this situation, discretion is more important than anything else.”

As we drive to the outskirts of the ranch on his tractor, Mr. Cattleman, as we’ll call him, fills us in on how he landed in this position. He’s been herding cattle here for close to 50 years, as one of the Golan Heights’ pioneer settlers after the region was liberated from Syria in the 1967 Six Day War. He grew up on the religious moshav of Beit Chilkiya in the center of the country, but the challenge of the northern heights pulled him. “I raise 200 head of cattle here on 5,000 dunams,” he says.

Seeing Red

Mr. Cattleman primarily raises Simmental cattle, a popular breed in Israel. But a few years ago, he was contacted by the staff of the Machon Hamikdash in Jerusalem, an institute dedicated to raising public awareness of the mitzvos related to the Beis Hamikdash. The men from the institute made him an offer that he couldn’t refuse. “They wanted me to raise an additional breed of cattle — Red Angus cows,” he says. “Their goal was to try to produce a perfect Parah Adumah which would meet all the halachic criteria.

“I said to myself, ‘What could be bad about this idea?’ After all, I’m a believing Jew, and if I have the opportunity to participate in a project like this, I should consider it a privilege. So I agreed to begin raising the cattle. It didn’t actually require any special effort. I raise cattle anyway, and the Red Angus is a very docile breed. They tend to be good-natured, obedient, and easy to control, and their meat is considered tastier and of better quality than the other breeds generally raised in these parts.”

In 2015, the Machon Hamikdash set its sights on raising a kosher Red Heifer in Israel. The rabbis of the institute had previously been in touch with cattle ranchers in the US who raise Red Angus cows, and they believe this species has the best chance of becoming an authentic Parah Adumah, with all the entailing stringencies from the time of the cow’s birth.

People might assume that red-colored cows are something otherworldly or extremely rare, but in fact there are dozens of species of red-colored cattle. The Machon originally considered importing some Red Angus cows to Israel for breeding, but Israel’s Ministry of Agriculture doesn’t permit the importation of cattle from other countries. They do permit the importation of frozen embryos though, and so the Machon teamed up with several ranchers, including Mr. Cattleman, an expert in the science of animal husbandry, who has been utilizing the technique of implanting these embryos in domestic cattle. The hope of the Machon is that if a totally red female cow is born, it will be cared for in a halachically appropriate environment that would minimize the possibility of a blemish that would render it unfit.”

(Excerpted from Mishpacha, Issue 754)

(They want you to think they have multiple heifers so no one can stick a date on the “one”. They may fool some but not here.)

TEN DAY OLD RED HEIFER CANDIDATE CHECKED FOR ELIGIBILITY

Rabbinic experts traveled this week from Jerusalem to two separate locations in Israel where a small number of red heifer candidates are being raised, as part the the Temple Institute’s Raise a Red Heifer in Israel program, initiated four years ago. Three of the most recent candidates were checked to determine whether they bore suitably red coats, as required by halacha (Jewish law) to render them eligible as red heifer candidates. One bore a small patch of white hairs, rendering it ineligible. One bore a few very light red hairs, which will require further inspection. A third candidate is currently eligible, and will also require follow up. It is important to note that these three heifers are not the only candidates currently being raised. This video clip was taken during the inspection.

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